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Women’s central role in history often overlooked: McDonald

8 March, 2013 - by Mary Lou McDonald TD


Speaking ahead of a very special event to be held in Dublin tonight celebrating women’s role in the 1913 Lockout, Sinn Féin Deputy Leader Mary Lou McDonald TD acknowledged the role of women in progressing workers’ rights over the last 100 years.
The Dublin Central TD said:
“Women across the island have played a central role in the fight for equality, justice and freedom, yet they are often overlooked by history. International Women’s Day affords us an opportunity to celebrate such women who selflessly fought so hard and gave up so much for the most basic of rights. Often these were ordinary women in extraordinary times.
“A very special event will be held tonight in Dublin tonight to celebrate women’s role in Dublin’s 1913 Lockout. Poverty was the norm in Dublin at that time. Mortality rates were comparable to Calcutta and families lived in overcrowded dilapidated tenement buildings.
“Unskilled workers had little or no rights and little prospect for improving their personal circumstances. In 1913 Big Jim Larkin led tram workers in their fight for trade union recognition.
“Whilst James Larkin is rightfully acknowledged by history his sister Delia Larkin is overlooked. Delia was a leading trade unionist in Dublin and fought for women’s rights and workers’ rights in equal measure.
“A very special event will be held in Dublin tonight to celebrate the 1913 Lockout and women’s role in this important historical landmark. A scene from the infamous ‘The Risen People’ will be performed by the East Wall PEG Variety and Drama Group, directed by Peter and Sheila Sheridan. Historian James Curry will give a talk on Delia Larkin and Niamh Parsons and Graham Dunne will breathe life into traditional music and song.”
Note to editors

Celebrating the involvement of women in the 1913 Lockout

Friday, 8th March at 7:30pm

The Presidents Room, The Law Society of Ireland, Blackhall Place, Dublin 7

No admission charge

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