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de Brún - Climate Change is apriority of the highest class for Sinn Féin in Europe and at home

9 December, 2007


Sinn Féin Press Office

44 Parnell Square

Dublin 2

Tel: 353 1 8722609

Email:[email protected]

 

For immediate release: December 9th 2007

 

de Brún – Climate Change is  a priority of the highest class for Sinn Féin in Europe and at home

 

Sinn Féin MEP for the six counties Bairbre de Brún and a member of the European’s Parliment’s Climate Change Committee speaking at a party conference in Dublin said: “Climate Change the major political challenge of our time. We must begin to get to take climate change and the fight against it into account as constant factors that must shape our thinking over

Sinn Féin Press Office

44 Parnell Square

Dublin 2

Tel: 353 1 8722609

Email:[email protected]

 

For immediate release: December 9th 2007

 

de Brún – Climate Change is  a priority of the highest class for Sinn Féin in Europe and at home

 

Sinn Féin MEP for the six counties Bairbre de Brún and a member of the European’s Parliment’s Climate Change Committee speaking at a party conference in Dublin said: “Climate Change the major political challenge of our time. We must begin to get to take climate change and the fight against it into account as constant factors that must shape our thinking over a wide range of issues. From now on whenever we talk about energy, industry, transport, agriculture, waste management, international aid - in fact almost every policy field we must include climate change at the heart of our strategies. Today, I want to state the intention of Sinn Féin to accept this challenge and to adapt our thinking accordingly, and to outline just some of the important areas in this respect.”

 

“As I speak, politicians and decision-makers from across the world are meeting in Bali, Indonesia to hammer out the details of a climate change deal for post-Kyoto, post-2012. This is a critical meeting and one of which there ought to be a greater public awareness of. As a member of the European Parliament's Climate Change Committee I have had input into the EP's position at these talks.  This influential committee was formed this year to coordinate the Parliament's position on cla wide range of issues. From now on whenever we talk about energy, industry, transport, agriculture, waste management, international aid - in fact almost every policy field we must include climate change at the heart of our strategies. Today, I want to state the intention of Sinn Féin to accept this challenge and to adapt our thinking accordingly, and to outline just some of the important areas in this respect.”

 

“As I speak, politicians and decision-makers from across the world are meeting in Bali, Indonesia to hammer out the details of a climate change deal for post-Kyoto, post-2012. This is a critical meeting and one of which there ought to be a greater public awareness of. As a member of the European Parliament's Climate Change Committee I have had input into the EP's position at these talks.  This influential committee was formed this year to coordinate the Parliament's position on climate change. Among other things it is mandated to

 

  • to study the environmental, legal, economic, social, geopolitical, regional and public-health impact of recent progress made and of future prospects;
  • to analyse and evaluate the state of climate change and propose appropriate measures, at all levels, accompanied by an assessment of both their financial impact and the cost of inaction;

 

and

  • to formulate proposals on the EU’s future integrated policy on climate change and to coordinate the Parliament’s position in the negotiations regarding the international framework for climate policy after 2012.

 

“I, and my colleagues are committed to fightingimate change. Among other things it is mandated to

 

  • to study the environmental, legal, economic, social, geopolitical, regional and public-health impact of recent progress made and of future prospects;
  • to analyse and evaluate the state of climate change and propose appropriate measures, at all levels, accompanied by an assessment of both their financial impact and the cost of inaction;

 

and

  • to formulate proposals on the EU’s future integrated policy on climate change and to coordinate the Parliament’s position in the negotiations regarding the international framework for climate policy after 2012.

 

“I, and my colleagues are committed to fighting for the most far-reaching and effective EU policy on climate change. My input into this committee will be based on an understanding of the consequences of failure for this and future generations.

 

“I have developed contacts with environmental NGOs in Ireland across Europe in order to improve my input into this committee. Friends of the Earth's excellent analysis of the problems facing us are of great influence in our thinking and planning. My work in the parliament is not limited to this special committee. I have also chaired important conferences on Climate Change and the Developing World and earlier next year will take part in another parliament conference on the climate change question. It is our intention to invite interested individuals and groups from Ireland to this conference to allow them to see the work we are doing in Brussels and to see how they can work with us to an even greater degree. Cl for the most far-reaching and effective EU policy on climate change. My input into this committee will be based on an understanding of the consequences of failure for this and future generations.

 

“I have developed contacts with environmental NGOs in Ireland across Europe in order to improve my input into this committee. Friends of the Earth's excellent analysis of the problems facing us are of great influence in our thinking and planning. My work in the parliament is not limited to this special committee. I have also chaired important conferences on Climate Change and the Developing World and earlier next year will take part in another parliament conference on the climate change question. It is our intention to invite interested individuals and groups from Ireland to this conference to allow them to see the work we are doing in Brussels and to see how they can work with us to an even greater degree. Climate Change is a priority of the highest class for Sinn Féin at EU level and at home.

 

“The Stern report and the 4th report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have spelled out in the clearest terms possible the consequences that climate change is having already and the disastrous potential effects to come. The scientific community are united in their acknowledgment of the dangers.

 

“As a political party, Sinn Féin accepts that attitudes need to be changed if Ireland is to play its part in the fight against climate change. This change in attitude must be seen in our policy positions.

 

“Transport is a major contributor to greenhouse emissions. Decades of underinvestment in our transport services mean a culture of car dependency has evolved in our countimate Change is a priority of the highest class for Sinn Féin at EU level and at home.

 

“The Stern report and the 4th report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have spelled out in the clearest terms possible the consequences that climate change is having already and the disastrous potential effects to come. The scientific community are united in their acknowledgment of the dangers.

 

“As a political party, Sinn Féin accepts that attitudes need to be changed if Ireland is to play its part in the fight against climate change. This change in attitude must be seen in our policy positions.

 

“Transport is a major contributor to greenhouse emissions. Decades of underinvestment in our transport services mean a culture of car dependency has evolved in our country. This dependency must be broken by providing efficient and sustainable public transport networks in cities, towns and rural areas. Aviation is also a part of this and I welcome recent moves at an EU level to include aviation within the scope of greenhouse gas emissions programmes.

 

“By arguing for decent and sufficient public investment in our public, and I stress public, transport services we remove the excuse for excessive car usage in every day life. This is especially true in urban areas where commutes to school and work should be doable on public transport alone. The massive commute by private car to and from Dublin every day is unsustainable not just for our families and communities but also for our planet.

 

“Outside of our big cities, public transport is just as important. A truly national rail system would take the pressure off ourry. This dependency must be broken by providing efficient and sustainable public transport networks in cities, towns and rural areas. Aviation is also a part of this and I welcome recent moves at an EU level to include aviation within the scope of greenhouse gas emissions programmes.

 

“By arguing for decent and sufficient public investment in our public, and I stress public, transport services we remove the excuse for excessive car usage in every day life. This is especially true in urban areas where commutes to school and work should be doable on public transport alone. The massive commute by private car to and from Dublin every day is unsustainable not just for our families and communities but also for our planet.

 

“Outside of our big cities, public transport is just as important. A truly national rail system would take the pressure off our road networks by connecting urban and rural areas to each other- and not just to Dublin or Belfast. The transport of freight could also be carried out in a more sustainable way by this well-developed rail system. Trains produce only a quarter of the emissions of lorries per ton/km.

 

“In terms of aviation, an all-Ireland campaign encouraging Irish people to holiday in our own country would bring (or keep) millions within our country while reducing our output in carbon emissions from such frequent flights abroad as we seen at present, with some people taking two or three holidays abroad each year.  As an island nation the use of maritime freight transport should be maximised. Forty times as much freight is moved by boats than by planes but they produce only twice the emissions.

 

“Each of these changes also bring with them another signific road networks by connecting urban and rural areas to each other- and not just to Dublin or Belfast. The transport of freight could also be carried out in a more sustainable way by this well-developed rail system. Trains produce only a quarter of the emissions of lorries per ton/km.

 

“In terms of aviation, an all-Ireland campaign encouraging Irish people to holiday in our own country would bring (or keep) millions within our country while reducing our output in carbon emissions from such frequent flights abroad as we seen at present, with some people taking two or three holidays abroad each year.  As an island nation the use of maritime freight transport should be maximised. Forty times as much freight is moved by boats than by planes but they produce only twice the emissions.

 

“Each of these changes also bring with them another significant advantage-namely, that they reduce our dependence on imported fossil fuels. In the years to come anything that reduces this dependence will constitute an excellent investment.

 

“And as we move to alternative fuels we need to ensure that environmental considerations are uppermost here, also. While biofuels can potentially play a part in the drive for a greater use of renewable energy there are important environmental considerations to be met.  We need to be aware of growing concerns about the impact of agro fuels production in much of Latin America on forestation, on biodiversity, on the environment in general and on human rights and food sovereignty.

 

“The question of security of energy supply is important to any economy and society. Self-sufficiency should be aimed for as much as practicably possible. In Ireland's case this meanant advantage-namely, that they reduce our dependence on imported fossil fuels. In the years to come anything that reduces this dependence will constitute an excellent investment.

 

“And as we move to alternative fuels we need to ensure that environmental considerations are uppermost here, also. While biofuels can potentially play a part in the drive for a greater use of renewable energy there are important environmental considerations to be met.  We need to be aware of growing concerns about the impact of agro fuels production in much of Latin America on forestation, on biodiversity, on the environment in general and on human rights and food sovereignty.

 

“The question of security of energy supply is important to any economy and society. Self-sufficiency should be aimed for as much as practicably possible. In Ireland's case this means the greatest possible use of our own resources such as solar, wind and tidal power and the development of energy saving, resource-efficient, renewable and low emission technologies.

 

“We lag far behind many EU countries in the quality of our homes, adding not only to climate change but to fuel poverty among our worst off citizens.  Rectifying this for existing as well as new homes will be a major challenge in the time ahead.

 

“The reduction in the creation of waste and the clean disposal of what waste is produced is another important part of the jigsaw. I have been very much involved in the European Parliament's handling of the upcoming Waste Framework Directive. At EU level and at local level across the thirty-two counties Sinn Féin has pushed for the "greenest" possible policy to be implemented. This involves prioritis the greatest possible use of our own resources such as solar, wind and tidal power and the development of energy saving, resource-efficient, renewable and low emission technologies.

 

“We lag far behind many EU countries in the quality of our homes, adding not only to climate change but to fuel poverty among our worst off citizens.  Rectifying this for existing as well as new homes will be a major challenge in the time ahead.

 

“The reduction in the creation of waste and the clean disposal of what waste is produced is another important part of the jigsaw. I have been very much involved in the European Parliament's handling of the upcoming Waste Framework Directive. At EU level and at local level across the thirty-two counties Sinn Féin has pushed for the "greenest" possible policy to be implemented. This involves prioritising wherever possible prevention, recycling and reuse. Central to this position is our rejection of incineration and our support for adherence to the waste hierarchy.   The European Parliament is pushing for binding targets on recycling to be set at EU level both the protect the environment and human health and to contribute to the battle against climate change and this should inform local authority investment decisions at home.

 

“Friends of the Earth have laid out some indisputable arguments as to why incineration is not the answer to our waste disposal problems. First of all, incinerators encourage the production of waste as they need waste to operate and survive. Thus local authorities have less incentive to operate recycling schemes. A knock-on effect is that less recycling means more waste as more new products from raw materials are needed. Thirdly, and of great importance, is that incinersing wherever possible prevention, recycling and reuse. Central to this position is our rejection of incineration and our support for adherence to the waste hierarchy.   The European Parliament is pushing for binding targets on recycling to be set at EU level both the protect the environment and human health and to contribute to the battle against climate change and this should inform local authority investment decisions at home.

 

“Friends of the Earth have laid out some indisputable arguments as to why incineration is not the answer to our waste disposal problems. First of all, incinerators encourage the production of waste as they need waste to operate and survive. Thus local authorities have less incentive to operate recycling schemes. A knock-on effect is that less recycling means more waste as more new products from raw materials are needed. Thirdly, and of great importance, is that incinerators of all types produce dangerous dioxins. Therefore, on the grounds of human health and of fighting climate change incinerators should be rejected in all cases.

 

“The successful economies of the future will be low carbon economies and Ireland can be at the forefront of moving in this direction.  By providing fiscal, incentives for investments in sustainable technologies, Ireland can properly position itself to meet the challenge of climate change and can be one of the providers of the technologies others will need.

 

“The societal and economic changes we are talking about here today are necessary. Ireland is well placed having never had any major extractive heavy-industries to advance quicker than others in developing an innovative clean economy. Our island could become a base for the new green economy. As a party, Sinn Féin wiators of all types produce dangerous dioxins. Therefore, on the grounds of human health and of fighting climate change incinerators should be rejected in all cases.

 

“The successful economies of the future will be low carbon economies and Ireland can be at the forefront of moving in this direction.  By providing fiscal, incentives for investments in sustainable technologies, Ireland can properly position itself to meet the challenge of climate change and can be one of the providers of the technologies others will need.

 

“The societal and economic changes we are talking about here today are necessary. Ireland is well placed having never had any major extractive heavy-industries to advance quicker than others in developing an innovative clean economy. Our island could become a base for the new green economy. As a party, Sinn Féin will support tax incentives at EU and national level for ecologically sound technologies.

 

“This potential must be grasped by all in power in this country. It must be factored in to all economic planning along with "climate change proofing". Our rural communities in particular possess great potential and should see this in terms of opportunities as well as challenges. We also need to halt the loss of biodiversity and to understand that forests, peatlands and wetlands store carbon and act as act as natural ‘CO2 sinks’.

 

“Many areas in the world have already been affected by the effects of an increase in global average temperatures, and the latest scientific evidence suggests that the next five years will be crucial in avoiding further irreversible damage. Even the EU's agreed long-term goal of limiting warmill support tax incentives at EU and national level for ecologically sound technologies.

 

“This potential must be grasped by all in power in this country. It must be factored in to all economic planning along with "climate change proofing". Our rural communities in particular possess great potential and should see this in terms of opportunities as well as challenges. We also need to halt the loss of biodiversity and to understand that forests, peatlands and wetlands store carbon and act as act as natural ‘CO2 sinks’.

 

“Many areas in the world have already been affected by the effects of an increase in global average temperatures, and the latest scientific evidence suggests that the next five years will be crucial in avoiding further irreversible damage. Even the EU's agreed long-term goal of limiting warming to +2°C compared to pre-industrial levels might not be sufficient to avoid significant negative effects of climate change.

 

“The poorest countries in the world will be worst hit and will be least able to prepare themselves and their economies to adapt to these changes. There needs to be a huge increase in aid to developing countries to help with climate change adaptation and these must be in addition to existing aid.

 

“Sinn Féin is committed to leading the way in fighting climate change in Ireland and for in pressing the Irish government to accept our international role in pursuing trade and development policies which are sustainable. This month, our councillors in Dublin won support for an ambitious new environment policy for our capital with sustainability at its core. The plan is to be reviewed each year and covers waste managemng to +2°C compared to pre-industrial levels might not be sufficient to avoid significant negative effects of climate change.

 

“The poorest countries in the world will be worst hit and will be least able to prepare themselves and their economies to adapt to these changes. There needs to be a huge increase in aid to developing countries to help with climate change adaptation and these must be in addition to existing aid.

 

“Sinn Féin is committed to leading the way in fighting climate change in Ireland and for in pressing the Irish government to accept our international role in pursuing trade and development policies which are sustainable. This month, our councillors in Dublin won support for an ambitious new environment policy for our capital with sustainability at its core. The plan is to be reviewed each year and covers waste management, planning, energy generation and biodiversity. It is our intention to initiate such moves across the country. Wherever Sinn Féin has influence the fight against climate change will not be neglected.” CRÍOCH

 

 

 

 

 

ent, planning, energy generation and biodiversity. It is our intention to initiate such moves across the country. Wherever Sinn Féin has influence the fight against climate change will not be neglected.” CRÍOCH

 

 

 

 

 

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