Sinn Féin - On Your Side

We need to get more people onto public transport

23 January, 2008


Sinn Féin Newry Armagh MLA Cathal Boylan has said that we need to encourage the use of public transport, because it will help reduce the number of serious road fatalities and injuries.

Mr Boylan said:

"It makes sense to encourage the use of public transport, because that will help reduce the number of serious road fatalities and injuries.

"It would also help reduce carbon emissions, and that is vital if we are serious about tackling climate change.

"An Executive commitment is to: "Maintain and develop the public road and rail network and improve public transport provision to deliver a modern, efficient and sustainable transport system that facilitates economic growth and social inclusion across the region".

"A major development will be a modern rapid-transit system that will serve the greater Belfast area and that, when integrated with improved conventional transport, will greatly alleviate traffic congestion in the city. However we must also examine the rail system throughout the country. Many parts are either without a rail system, or there is a need to improve the existing network.

"I also hope that the Executive, together with their colleagues and counterparts in the South, will not only look for investment but to improve the present network, especially in the central areas, to develop the north-east and north-west.

"We must open up public transport to as many people as possible throughout the country. However, they will only be able to avail themselves of public transport if they can access it close to their homes. It is not feasible to expect a commuter to travel from Enniskillen to Portadown in order to catch a train to Derry or Belfast.

"There is no magic wand. We do not use the transport system to its maximum effect. The key is to encourage the use of the transport system that is already in place - to encourage people to use the buses and trains, and to use the profits to improve that system." ENDS

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