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AIB outsourcing plans part of a wider worrying trend - Doherty

13 January, 2015 - by Pearse Doherty TD


Sinn Féin Finance Spokesperson Pearse Doherty TD has said the AIB move to outsource its IT workforce is part of a wider worrying trend among Irish banks, including the Central Bank, to outsource essential IT systems.

Speaking today Deputy Doherty said:

“I have been aware for some time that this move has been on the cards.  What we are seeing is a now profitable State bank outsourcing, putting jobs and customer supports at risk. Sinn Féin is opposed to such outsourcing. It is not a solution to the serious issues facing our banking system.

“In this case it seems AIB have decided to proceed to outsource hundreds of IT jobs. The bank should make sure that no jobs are lost and that the rights and conditions including Trade Union recognition must be respected by any companies taking on a contract. Any changes should only be made after agreement with the Trade Unions representing the staff concerned. It is important that any such agreement is long term in nature so that these jobs are not off-shored once the dust has settled.

“The Minister for Finance owns 99% of AIB and has a responsibility to make sure workers at what is a State company are treated fairly. Workers at AIB should not be thrown to the wolves to make AIB look leaner for potential suitors. AIB has recently returned to profit so there is no justification for now cutting jobs.

“This outsourcing is part of a more worrying trend across the banking sector including the Central Bank where essential IT services are sold to third parties. The computer failure at Ulster Bank in Summer 2012 has been put down to a failure caused by an over reliance on outsourcing. The recent fine levied on it for this failure was tiny. The security, competition and privacy issues raised are enormous and any bank, especially a State owned one, should not pretend outsourcing is a solution to the serious issues still haunting our banking system.” 

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