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EU must give the South East a chance – Liadh Ní Riada MEP

28 June, 2016 - by Liadh Ní Riada MEP


Sinn Féin MEP Liadh Ní Riada has said she will engage in high level lobbying in Brussels and Strasbourg in support of the Three Sisters 2020 bid for European Capital of Culture designation. Speaking in Kilkenny where she met with Mr. Michael Quinn, who heads up the bid team, Liadh explained that she will meet with the European Commissioner with overall responsibility for the scheme. 

Liadh Ní Riada said:

“The South East has so much to offer to visitors, to investors and most crucially to the people who live there. The Three Sisters bid sums up the potential of the region, as well as the creativity and human wealth that can be found in Kilkenny, Waterford and Wexford.


“I will meet next week with the European Commissioner for Culture Mr. Tibor Navracsics in Strasbourg to put forward the case for the South East to be awarded the European Capital of Culture designation in 2020. 


“A decision will be made in mid-July and between now and then I will lobby at European level to raise awareness of the huge potential of the South East. 


“This bid is novel in its approach and impressive in its breadth. It factors in the cultural wealth of the South East, and weaves a tapestry that includes opera in Wexford, the craft tradition in Kilkenny and the high-energy street performance that marks summer in Waterford. 


“The team behind the bid have put together an ambitious programme that will use the Capital of Culture as a foundation for the development of a sustainable and vibrant cultural sector for the South East, ensuring that there is long-term benefit to any investment. 


“Success will not just mean an increase in visitor numbers, or greater access to the arts for locals, but it will bring strong investment in the South-East and lead to job creation and economic growth. Following years of neglect from successive Governments it is now time for the South East to be given a chance.”

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