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Government’s Transport Budget has neither drive nor engine behind it – Imelda Munster TD

11 October, 2016 - by Imelda Munster TD


Sinn Féin Spokesperson for Transport, Imelda Munster TD has today dismissed the provisions for the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport as pitiful. Speaking after the announcement this afternoon that the additional allocation for the Department of Transport is only €70million, she spoke of her disappointment that infrastructure continues to be neglected by successive governments.

Deputy Munster said:

“Minister Ross has failed miserably in securing funding for his Department. Sinn Féin pledged over €100million more than the government announced today in our Alternative Budget. As a country we have to invest in infrastructure and transport if we expect the economy and our communities to grow”.

Deputy Munster also addressed the announcement that Sports Capital Grants would not be available in 2016.

Deputy Munster continued:

 “I have been asking Minister Ross for months whether we can expect to see Sports Capital Grants in 2016 and until today I have not received a definitive answer until Minister Donohoe made his announcement today that the grants would not be available until next year. In our Alternative Budget Sinn Féin proposed to increase the grant allocation by €4million, and to annualise the grant.”

Deputy Munster also expressed disappointment that disability access, the Rural Transport Programme, cross-border infrastructural projects, tourism promotion, harbours and coastal infrastructure, all allocated additional funding in Sinn Féin’s  Alternative Budget, were ignored by Ministers Ross and Donohoe in the Budget.

Deputy Munster concluded:

“I was shocked to hear no mention of the Rural Transport Programme or disability access on public transport today. Sinn Féin pledged €2.1million for the RTP and €10million to build wheelchair accessible bus stops. I am very disappointed that the government did not prioritise these issues”.

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